Wednesday, 2 November 2016

My Life Cycle of a Frog

In the past week I have written an explanation on the life cycle of a frog because I brought some tadpoles into the class. I had to write the stages from egg to frog plus an introduction and I had four paragraphs because there are four stages, egg, tadpoles, tadpoles with legs and frog. Here is my explanation about the life cycle of a frog.



The Life Cycle Of A Frog       
A frog is a very unique creature that is an amphibian and it has a very unusual life cycle. They have four different stages from egg to adult.
Stage One: Eggs  
When the frogs lay their eggs they are surrounded by a gel. The gel protects them from animals that want to eat them because at that stage they are very weak. At this stage they look like a tiny rock inside some clear rubber.During this stage, the egg is not considered to be a tadpole yet.
Stage Two: Tadpoles   

When the eggs hatch little tadpoles come out and start to eat all the algae in the pond or lake that they are in. When they have eaten all the algae they are big enough to eat dead carcasses that lie on the bottom of the mud. When they are at this stage they look like a bigger black stone with a turtle flipper coming out the end.
Stage Three: Tadpoles With Legs    
When the tadpoles get older they start to grow legs that help them swim. First the back legs come out and then the front legs. The legs help them grip onto things and swim through the water faster. When they are like this, they look like an even bigger black stone that has a flipper and some legs.

Stage Four: Adult frog    
When the tadpoles have grown all their legs they start to lose their tails and get a different look by changing their skin colour. When they have done that they go out of the water and go to find a frog to mate with and the stages all start again. At this final stage they look like a brown oval with legs and eyes.
Image result for New Zealand adult frog
Conclusion    
There are four stages that a frog has to go through to develop from frog spawn to a frog .
  
   



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